Mesa Boogie Recto 4x12 Standard Slant
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Mesa Boogie Recto 4x12 Standard Slant

Recto 4x12 Standard Slant, 4x12 Guitar Cabinet from Mesa Boogie in the Rectifier cabinet series.

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Hatsubai 16/03/2011

Mesa Boogie Recto 4x12 Standard Slant : la opinión de Hatsubai (content in English)

"Tight and percussive 4x12"
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The Mesa/Boogie Traditional 4x12 (now called the Stiletto 4x12) comes standard with four Mesa/Boogie Vintage 30 speakers. These speakers are a touch different from the normal V30s in that they can withstand higher wattage. On top of that, they tend to sound a bit thicker. The entire cabinet is made out of Baltic Birch, and it can be run in either 8 ohms or 4 ohms. Overall, this cab is built like a tank, and it sounds absolutely amazing. One problem quite a bit of people tend to have with the original standard Mesa/Boogie cabinets is that can get a bit heavy in the low end. This cabinet has its midrange shifted a bit and is tighter than the standard model. However, it still retains that awesome percussive quality the standard cabinet has.

The tolex on this is a fairly durable tolex, to boot. Some companies have real thin tolex that tends to chip or flake, but this can withstand quite a bit of abuse. You don’t need to worry about plastic handles breaking off as Mesa uses sturdy metal handles. The wiring inside the cabinet is thick and does not need to be replaced. The speakers are rear loaded, which I tend to prefer. Rear loaded cabs usually aren’t quite as directional, so it helps make the overall sound a touch more warmer, while the more “traditional” dimensions allow it to maintain its tightness.

If somebody was looking for a high quality V30 equipped guitar cabinet, this would be my number one recommendation. It’s actually the recommended cabinet by John Petrucci as well. My personal model is a slanted cabinet, but if I had to do it again, I’d probably get the straight simply because it’s a bit easier to mic the upper speakers. When miking the bottom speakers, reflections from the floor can interfere with the overall sound.